Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 87, dies

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured, was nominated by President Bill Clinton in 1993 to become a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Ginsburg died Friday evening due to complications of pancreatic cancer. (Jacquelyn Martin/AP)Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured, was nominated by President Bill Clinton in 1993 to become a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Ginsburg died Friday evening due to complications of pancreatic cancer. (Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Miranda Prescott, News Editor

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away on Friday due to complications of pancreatic cancer. She was 87 at the time of her passing. Her death was announced in a statement by the Supreme Court.

“Our nation has lost a jurist of historic stature,” said Chief Justice John Roberts of Ginsburg. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her – a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

Ginsburg was born in 1933 in New York. She would go on to earn her bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in 1954, where she finished first in her class. Afterwards, she began law school at Harvard University, where she became the first woman to be a member of the Harvard Law Review. In 1959, she graduated with her law degree from Columbia, also finishing first in her class.

“How fortunate I was to be alive and a lawyer, when, for the first time in U.S. History, it became possible to urge, successfully, before legislatures and courts, the equal citizenship stature of women and men as a fundamental constitutional principle,” Ginsburg said in a 2016 op-ed for The New York Times.

In 1993, President Bill Clinton selected Ginsburg to replace Justice Byron White on the Supreme Court. She became the second woman ever to serve on the Supreme Court, where she sat on the bench for 27 years.

“Justice Ginsburg paved the way for so many women, including me,” said former First Lady Hillary Clinton in a post to Twitter. “There will never be another like her.”

“She changed the way the world is for American women,” writes the National Public Radio. “For more than a decade, until her first judicial appointment in 1980, she led the fight in the courts for gender equality. By the time she donned judicial robes, however, Ginsberg had worked a revolution.”

As for what is to come next with Ginsburg’s passing, the potential for a third Trump nomination to the Supreme Court is there. However, Ginsburg did have some words before her passing as to what she believed should come next.

“My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,” she reportedly told her granddaughter, Clara Spera.

According to the Supreme Court, a private service will be held for her at the Arlington National Cemetery.

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